Climate change mitigation in developing countries through interregional collaboration by local governments: Japanese citizens’ preference

In Energy Policy
Volume (Issue): 39
Peer-reviewed Article

This study explores the motivation of domestic and international interregional collaboration on climate change mitigation through carbon crediting by Japanese local governments, using a social survey. In particular the authors evaluate the current state and difficulties in promoting climate change mitigation in developing countries through interregional carbon crediting from the perspective of citizens. The study finds balanced collaboration with domestic partner regions and developing countries is preferred in the case of collaboration, given that the unit cost of collaboration is assumed lower than that of no collaboration, though the preference for collaboration would be weaker in the population compared to the samples. Appreciation of benefits such as technology transfer and local environmental improvement in developing countries increases the preference of collaboration with developing countries. There are two factors to hinder Japanese local governments’ interregional collaboration with developing countries from the perspective of citizens: a sense of environmental responsibility to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions within the city and a preference for domestic orientation even if the collaboration with developing countries is less costly and has benefits of technology transfer and local environmental improvement. The preference for a lower total cost of GHG emissions reductions is confirmed except for those with a sense of environmental responsibility. The study also finds that provision of information on mitigation projects and co-benefits would increase the preference for interregional collaboration with developing countries depending on the types of collaborative project, except for those with a sense of environmental responsibility.

Author:
Takaaki
Kato
Date: