• Climate and Energy

    Bangkok Regional Workshop on Low Carbon Technology Transfer and Diffusion

Bangkok Regional Workshop on Low Carbon Technology Transfer and Diffusion Under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), CTCN, the implementation body of the Technology Mechanism has started providing technical assistance and information on goods and services related to climate-relevant technologies to developing country Parties. For the CTCN to be fully and effectively operationalised, however, there still remain many areas for improvement, for example, in terms of capacity building for developing requests to the CTCN, as well as better understanding of the needs and seeds of relevant technologies.

This workshop is part of an initiative by the Ministry of the Environment, Japan, to support the CTCN, through collaboration with CTCN/UNEP itself. It should be noted, however, that this workshop is not officially endorsed by the CTCN. Participants are from international organisations, NDEs and/or focal points in eight developing countries in Asia, research institutes, financial institutes, and private companies in Japan and other countries.

Against this background, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and the Asian Technology (AIT) held a regional workshop on low-carbon technology transfer and diffusion, with financial support from the Ministry of the Environment, Japan1. The main purposes of this workshop were as follows:

  1. To provide an overview of the current status of and needs for low-carbon technology transfer and diffusion in eight Asian countries: Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam
  2. To examine appropriate re-engineering or customisation elements of specific low-carbon technologies in a way that accelerates their uptake and diffusion in the Asia-Pacific
  3. To share lessons and experience of developing sample requests for the CTCN
  4. To gain better understanding of the various channels through which CTCN services can lead to technology transfer projects under financial institutions

1 Focus was on energy efficiency technologies, renewable energy technologies and waste to energy technologies

  • Date 2-3 March 2015
    Venue Novotel Bangkok on Siam Square, Thailand
    Co-organisers IGES,
    Asian Institute of Technology (AIT),
    National Science Technology and Innovation Policy Office (STI) of the Ministry of Science and Technology, Thailand
    Sponsor Ministry of the Environment, Japan (MOEJ)
    Related Information Agenda (36KB)
  • Presentation Materials
  • Purpose and Structure of the Workshop
    Kentaro Tamura, IGES
    PDF (104KB)
    Introduction and Update to the CTCN
    Rajiv Garg, UNEP-ROAP
    PDF (1.1MB)
    Learning and Future Challenges for Low Carbon Technology Transfer:
    A case of SMEs in India

    Upinder Singh Dhingra, TERI
    PDF (532KB)
    Implementation of Technology Transfer in Indonesia
    Widiatmini Sih Winanti, Indonesian National Council on Climate Change
    PDF (301KB)
    Expectation from CLIMATE TECHNOLOGY CENTER AND NETWORK
    Zaw Min Thant, Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry, Myanmar
    PDF (379KB)
    National preparation for CTCN and Technology application
    Iresha Rajapakse, Ministry of Mahaweli Development & Environment, Sri Lanka
    PDF (776KB)
    Overview of the current status of and needs for low‐carbon technology transfer and diffusion
    Supak Virunhakarun, National Science Technology and Innovation Policy Office,
    Ministry of Science and Technology, Thailand
    PDF (1.3MB)
    Domestic preparation and arrangement for technology transfer in Viet Nam
    Le Ngoc Tuan, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Viet Nam
    PDF (154KB)
    Request Eligibility to the CTCN
    Rajiv Garg, UNEP-ROAP
    PDF (295KB)
    Integrated Mechanical Biological and Thermal Treatment of Municipal Solid Waste
    Muchtar Muchamad/Sri Wahyono, PT. Wahana Usaha Universal/ Agency for Assessment and Application of Technology, Indonesia
    PDF (1.1MB)
    Preparation for CTCN request
    Nguyen Tung Lam, Institute of Strategy and Policy on Natural Resources and Environment,
    Viet Nam
    PDF (355KB)
    Summary of technology needs and experience in drafting sample request forms in the context of Bangladesh
    Md. Ziaur Rahman Khan, University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh
    PDF (301KB)
    Energy Efficiency in Japan and Introduction of JASE-World
    Noriaki Taketani, Japanese Business Alliance for Smart Energy Worldwide (JASE-World)
    PDF (2.0KB)
    Panasonic's Low Carbon Technology and Products
    Masashi Yasuda, Panasonic Corporation
    PDF (6.4KB)
    JICA's Technical Cooperation Schemes‐Toward low-carbon and sustainable development
    Yojiro Miyashita, JICA
    PDF (424MB)
    ADB's Pilot Asia‐Pacific Climate Technology Finance Center (CTFC)
    Xuedu LU, ADB
    PDF (219MB)
    Financing Technology Transfer and Diffusion
    Abdessalem Rabhi, IGES
    PDF (827MB)
Workshop Summary

The Bangkok Regional Workshop on Low Carbon Technology Transfer and Diffusion, jointly organised by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) and Thailand’s National Science Technology and Innovation Policy Office (STI) of the Ministry of Science and Technology with funding support from the Ministry of the Environment, Japan (MOEJ), took place in Bangkok on 2-3 March, 2015. Approximately 50 participants who are national designated entities (NDEs) of the CTCN and/or focal points in eight developing countries (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam), representatives of international organisations, research institutes, financial agencies, private companies from Japan and other countries joined the workshop.

The workshop achieved the overall objectives of understanding the current status of and needs for low-carbon technology transfer and diffusion in developing countries, sharing lessons and experience of drafting requests for the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN), examining customisation elements of low-carbon technologies to accelerate their uptake and diffusion in the Asia-Pacific region and seeking links with financial institutions.

The first day began with the opening speeches by Mr. Shigemoto Kajihara, director general of MOEJ; Dr. Somchai Chatratana, deputy secretary general of STI; and Professor Sivanappan Kumar, vice president of AIT. The three high level officials all noted the significant role the CTN is taking in promoting low-carbon technology transfer and diffusion and in bridging the emissions gap against the 2C degree goal. The rest of the day focused on a more thorough understanding of the current status of the CTCN, the technology needs in developing countries and the challenges of technology transfer and diffusion. Mr. Rajiv Garg of Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP ROAP), introduced the CTCN as a technical scheme, which takes a neutral position in the selection process with regard to region, technology and sector as well as in the linking and matching process with financial institutions. He noted that the CTCN assists in every stage of the technology cycle and technology assistance is not limited to hardware but also software and institutional capacity building. He further elaborated that the CTCN uses three criteria to decide the eligibility of a request. These criteria are: (1) will the support contribute to increased resilience and/or mitigation emissions and is it aligned with national plans? (2) will the support enhance endogenous capacities? (3) whether processes are in place in the requesting country to monitor and evaluate any support provided?

Representatives from eight countries shared their experience of technology transfer and diffusion in their respective countries. They also shared their sample requests for the CTCN. The experience sharing demonstrates that developing countries have a wide range of technology needs, including but not limited to, solid waste management, heat pumps, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and renewable energy development. Their preparations for CTCN requests are also at different stages: some countries have drafted their requests, while others are in the consultation phase and have yet to develop requests or to register their NDEs.

The participants were then divided into four groups (solid waste management, heat pumps, LEDs, solar energy) for further discussion of improving their sample CTCN requests. The group discussions were around the questions of refining sample requests, establishing links with funding schemes and identifying the challenges of implementing CTCN requests. The key challenges identified by all groups included the high initial cost of investing in low-carbon technologies, the lack of relevant policies and standards, limited capacity and awareness and the difficulty of accessing finance.

Representatives from Japanese Business Alliance for Smart Energy Worldwide (JASE-World), Panasonic Corporation and KAMI Electronics, Inc. showcased various energy efficient and energy conserving products and activities. The current prospect of the energy consumption and activities in Japan, Asia and the world were introduced. Japanese low-carbon technologies including LEDs, heat pumps, solar PVs, power storage systems and home appliances were introduced. They demonstrated that energy conservation products and technologies can benefit the triple-bottom-line of developing countries, including the social, economic and environmental needs of society. They also showed that the private sector can provide innovative solutions for GHG reduction through their products and technologies.

The second day was devoted to the discussion of how CTCN requests can be matched with funding schemes and how research institutes can further support NDEs to facilitate the implementation of technology transfer and diffusion. Representatives from the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley introduced various bilateral, multilateral and private funding opportunities offered by their institutes. However, the existing practice of climate finance places an overemphasis on the initial cost. The lack of awareness and information, the lack of project finance and long term finance in host countries, high interest rates, and low energy costs all have negative impacts on the implementation of climate finance. In particular, the lack of matchmaking between funding agencies and technology providers/acquirers is one of the most critical problems. Funding agencies lack synergies and are implementing finance schemes in a fragmentary way. On the other hand, hundreds of feasibility studies were completed without follow-up action. The IGES-TERI collaboration on-the-ground, introduced by IGES, implies that research institutes have the potential of being the matchmakers and filling in this gap.

Group discussion of the role of research institutes in supporting NDEs for implementing technology transfer indicated that information regarding local conditions at the demand side is crucial for customising technologies and making necessary technical renovation. Such information as well as information about best operating practices and successful case studies should be collected and be accessible to NDEs. More effort is required to increase the number of CTCN network members and all relevant stakeholders are encouraged to create a breakthrough at climate negotiations. Since the engagement of the private sector and the engagement of the matching with relevant financial schemes remain among the major challenges, NGOs/NPOs could play a significant role that would support the efforts being made by the CTCN.

Go to top of page